Morris Adjmi Morris Adjmi Architects

The buildings designed by Morris Adjmi Architects are shaped by the city but infused with a deep appreciation for the arts. In the office, we surround ourselves with a rotating display of eclectic and interdisciplinary work by artists who inspire our practice, and we’re dedicated to sharing this work through regular exhibitions. This program began in 2015 with a showing of rarely seen drawings and paintings by celebrated Italian Architect Aldo Rossi, Morris Adjmi’s mentor and former partner who himself was strongly influenced by the metaphysical expressions of painter Giorgio de Chirico. Our program has continued with a diverse selection of artists whose work ranges from refined minimalist compositions to colorful expressions of abstraction.

 
 
 

CURRENT EXHIBITION


The Forgery Show
September 28, 2017 – January 8, 2018

 

 
 

UPCOMING EXHIBITION


Saskia Boelsums
January 18, 2018 – April 16, 2018

 

 
 

PAST EXHIBITIONS


War & Peace:Vera Rossi, Fausto Rossi, Gianlorenzo Gasperini
July 27, 2017 – September 16, 2017


GROUP SHOW
March 16, 2017 – May 19, 2017


Holiday MArket
November 24, 2016 – January 27, 2017


Lyle Starr
September 29, 2016 – December 21, 2016


Nicole Patel
June 16, 2016 – August 24, 2016


Matthias van Arkel
February 04, 2016 – April 29, 2016


Aldo Rossi
November 05, 2015 – January 28, 2016

 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


The Forgery Show
September 28, 2017 – January 8, 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adrienne van Summern
Pandora (after Alexandre Cabanel, 1873), 2017
Oil on canvas
28 x 20 in
 
 

Aleksander Balos
Bashi-Bazouk (after Jean-Léon Gérôme, 1868-89), 2015
Oil on linen
32 x 26 in
 
 

Aleksander Balos
Betty (after Gerhard Richter, 1942), 2016
Oil on linen
40 x 27 in
 
 

Cindy Schultheis-Corrales
Young Girl Reading (after Jean-Honoré Fragonard, 1769), 2017
Oil on canvas
20 x 16 in
 
 

Dustin Bonivert
Old Man in Military Costume (after Rembrandt Harmensz Van Rijn, 1631), 2017
Oil on wood
26 x 20 in
 
 

Janet Crittenden
Art of Painting (after Johannes Vermeer, 1668), 2017
Oil on wood
40 x 30 in
 
 

Karen Copsey
Mona Lisa (after Leonardo da Vinci, 1506), 2017
Oil on wood
30 x 21 in
 
 

Judy Hester
The Lacemaker (after Johannes Vermeer, 1670), 2015
Oil on linen
9 x 8 in
 
 

Karol McGuire
Portrait of a Young Woman (after Sandro Botticelli, 1485), 2017
Oil on canvas
31 x 21 in
 
 

Leonard Brown
The Desperate Man (Self Portrait) (after Gustave Courbet, 1843), 2015
Oil on canvas
18 x 22 in
 
 

Leonard Brown
Girl with Beret (after Lucian Freud, 1951), 2017
Oil on canvas
21 x 16 in
 
 

Marga Moons-Filip
Cyclops (after Odilon Redon, 1914), 2015
Oil on canvas
24 x 18 in
 
 

Michael Wecksler
Nighthawks (after Edward Hopper, 1942), 2016
Oil on canvas
20 x 36 in
 
 

Michael Wecksler
Portrait of Chaim Soutine (after Amedeo Modigliani, 1915), 2015
Oil on canvas
14 x 11 in
 
 

Aleksander Balos
Mona Lisa (after Leonardo da Vinci, 1506), 2017
Oil on wood
30 x 21 in
 
 

Lou Wandro
Mona Lisa (after Leonardo da Vinci, 1506), 2013
Oil on wood
30 x 21 in
 
 

Karen Copsey
Mona Lisa (after Leonardo da Vinci, 1506), 2017
Oil on wood
30 x 21 in
 
 

Jenny Purtle
Mona Lisa (after Leonardo da Vinci, 1506), 2017
Oil on wood
30 x 21 in
 
 

Janet Crittenden
Mona Lisa (after Leonardo da Vinci, 1506), 2017
Oil on wood
30 x 21 in
 
 

Dustin Bonivert
Mona Lisa (after Leonardo da Vinci, 1506), 2017
Oil on wood
30 x 21 in
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


War & Peace: Vera Rossi, Fausto Rossi, Gianlorenzo Gasperini
July 27, 2017 – September 16, 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 

Vera Rossi
Vase with Roses, 2014
Photo print behind acrylic
Edition 5 of 7
69 x 50 cm
 
 

Vera Rossi
Tre Vasi Blu, 2017
Photo print behind acrylic
47 x 41 cm
 
 

Vera Rossi
Lung-Ta, 2017
Photo print behind acrylic
Edition 4 of 7
75 x 50 cm
 
 

Vera Rossi
Due Vasi Blu, 2016
Photo print behind acrylic
Edition 3 of 7
80 x 60 cm
 
 

Vera Rossi
With Freedom, Books, Flowers, and the Moon, 2017
Photo print behind acrylic
Edition 2 of 7
115 x 90 cm
 
 

Vera Rossi
A Flower Blossoms for it’s Own Joy, 2016
Photo print behind acrylic
Edition 3 of 7
115 x 80 cm
 
 

Vera Rossi
Prota sul Giardino, 2017
Photo print behind acrylic
Edition 1 of 5
90 x 71 cm
 
 

Vera Rossi
L’Albero, 2017
Photo print behind acrylic
Edition 1 of 7
52 x 50 cm
 
 

Vera Rossi
Distanza, 2017
Photo print behind acrylic
Edition 1 of 7
56 x 51 cm
 
 

Vera Rossi
Finestra, 2017
Photo print behind acrylic
Edition 1 of 3
64 x 110 cm
 
 

Vera Rossi
I Fiori di Amira, 2017
Photo print behind acrylic
Edition 2 of 7
68 x 50 cm
 
 

Vera Rossi
Varco Verde 3, 2014
Photo print behind acrylic
80 x 60 cm
 
 

Fausto Rossi
La battaglia di Legnano, 2009
Ink, acrylic and watercolor on paper
83 x 113 cm
 
 

Fausto Rossi
“Per mantenere la pace”, 2006
Ink, acrylic and watercolor on paper
76 x 105 cm
 
 

Fausto Rossi
Un’ora prima del tramonto, 2015
Ink, acrylic and watercolor on paper
71 x 68 cm
 
 

Fausto Rossi
Alla ricerca di J Pollock, 2012
Ink, acrylic and watercolor on paper
71.5 x 101 cm
 
 

Fausto Rossi
Battaglia di corso Magenta, 2007
Ink, acrylic and watercolor on paper
Edition 25 of 75
36 x 51 cm
 
 

Fausto Rossi
Le immagini ghiacciate, 2016
Ink, acrylic and watercolor on paper
31 x 43 cm
 
 

Fausto Rossi
L’alfa e l’omega, 2016
Ink, acrylic and watercolor on paper
22 x 30 cm
 
 

Fausto Rossi
Cento giorni dopo l’isola d’Elba, 2016
Ink, acrylic and watercolor on paper
22 x 30 cm
 
 

Fausto Rossi
La battaglia di Austerlitz, 2016
Ink, acrylic and watercolor on paper
19 x 27 cm
 
 

Fausto Rossi
La conquista di Milano, 2017
Ink, acrylic and watercolor on paper
37 x 52 cm
 
 

Fausto Rossi
L’ultimo quadro di Fausto, 2017
Ink, acrylic and watercolor on paper
30.4 x 36 cm
 
 

Fausto Rossi
La battaglia di Waterloo, 2016
Ink, acrylic and watercolor on paper
19 x 27 cm
 
 

Fausto Rossi
Una nuova speranza, 2016
Ink, acrylic and watercolor on paper
37 x 52 cm
 
 

Fausto Rossi
Passare attraverso la Svizzera?, 2015
Ink, acrylic and watercolor on paper
34 x 49 cm
 
 

Gianlorenzo Gasperini
Uomo piegato, 2017
Acrylic resin
22 x 37 x 37 cm
 
 

Gianlorenzo Gasperini
David, 2017
Acrylic resin
65 x 47 x 16 cm
 
 

Gianlorenzo Gasperini
Rebus (due parole 12-7), 2017
Acrylic resin
84 x 49 x 62 cm
 
 

Gianlorenzo Gasperini
Contraerea, 2016
Resin
64 x 77 x 77 cm
 
 

Gianlorenzo Gasperini
Testa 2, 2013
Plaster
23 x 14 x 23 cm
 
 

Gianlorenzo Gasperini
Facchino, 2017
Acrylic resin
(1 work, 2 elements)
53 x 53 x 23 cm
 
 

Gianlorenzo Gasperini
Uomo Seduto, 1997
Bronze
60 x 33 x 45 cm
 
 

Gianlorenzo Gasperini
Torso, 1997
Bronze
105 x 30.5 x 35 cm
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


GROUP SHOW
March 16, 2017 – May 19, 2017

 
 

 

 

Sam Ashford
Waiting for rain #2, 2016
Digital inkjet print with artist frame (Edition of 5 + 2 AP)
20.5 x 29.5″
 
 

Analisa Barron
Dont forget to bring something back, 2016
Cerrosafe, cerrobend, pewter, metal jewelry chain, steel rod, steel chain, miniature ornaments
36 x 36 x 24 in
 
 

Madeleline Bialke
Another East I, 2016
Oil on panel
30 x 24 in
 
 

Jon Blank
Hallie 7 1/4″ Silver LED 3/4 View #1 & #2, 2016
Oil on canvas
12 x 12 in each (diptych)
 
 

Tom Brydelsky
Two Shades of Grey, 2017
Encaustic on archival print on wood
48 x 64 in (diptych)
 
 

Peter Calvin
Whitesands No. 2, 2015
Digital print on dibond (edition of 5)
17.5 x 48 in
 
 

Luke Erickson + Alexa Patel
The House of Disquiet #4, 2016
Ink on paper
36 x 24 in
 
 

FOO/SKOU
Format No. 2, 2017
Wall composition, iPhone app
Dimensions vary
 
 

Gianlorenzo Gasperini
David, 2005
Bronze
12.5 x 5 x 3 in
 
 

Lisa Mahar
Untitled (From the Noah’s Raven series), 2016
Archival inkjet print (edition of 5)
24 x 20 in
 
 

Doreen McCarthy
Voice Inversion, 2015
Vinyl
36 x 36 x 36 in
 
 

Mentor Noci
Clocks in a Box, 2016
Hand-pulled linocut prints on cotton paper
14 x 11 in
 
 

Natalia Porter
Death Centos, 2013
Letterpress print (edition of 75)
21 x 17 in
 
 

Very Rossi
Varco Verde 2, 2014
C-print
23.5 x 35.5 in
 
 

Sean Slaney
Blast Off, 2017
Plaster cloth over armature
43.5 x 18 x 10 in
 
 

David Samuel Stern
Richelle, 2016
Photographic prints on archival vellum, hand woven together
46 x 36 in
 
 

Brett Swenson
Glass/Plaster, 2016
Tempered glass, blue intaglio ink, cast gypsum cement
36 x 30 x .5 in
 
 

Sena Wataya
Untitled (Empire), 2016
Brick, primer
4.5 x 9 x 2.5 in
 
 
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Lyle Starr
September 29, 2016 – December 21, 2016

 
 
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Lyle Starr (b. 1962) lives in NY and has had numerous one-person shows. His work is in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.
 
Image Credit: Etienne Frossard
 
See images from Lyle Starr’s opening party here
 
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Nicole Patel
June 16, 2016 – August 24, 2016

 
 
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Image Credit: Jenny Gorman
 
 
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Matthias van Arkel
February 04, 2016 – April 29, 2016

 
 
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Matthias van Arkel (b 1967) is a Swedish artist based in Stockholm and New York. A painter at heart he investigates what painting can be. His characteristic paintings weave tongues of coloured platinum silicone rubber together, combining a vibrant expressionistic approach with conceptual references to abstract art and minimalism. The paintings exist as an immediate and continuous appearance of luminous matter, enclosing their own visual structures as well as activating the surrounding space. The paintings rapid distribution of events suggests constant movement where only stillness pervades. This exalted immobility is a paradoxical feature of van Arkel´s sensuously poetic paintings. His anti-compositional practice results from decisions based on a tension between conscious and intuitive knowledge.
 
Matthias van Arkel holds a MFA from University College of Arts, and studied painting at Royal Institute of Art, both in Stockholm, Sweden. He has exhibited extensively both in Sweden and internationally, and is represented in several public and private collections, including Moderna Museet in Stockholm. Among his several public commissions is a large two-part painting at the Jakobsberg bus terminal, north of Stockholm, Sweden. And in 2015 he made a large scale site specific project in Morris Adjmi Architects new building for JBG-Companies in Washington DC.
 
See images from Mathias van Arkel’s opening party here
 
matthiasvanarkel.com
 
 
Image Credit: Alexander Severin
 
 
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Aldo Rossi
November 05, 2015 – January 28, 2016

 
 
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H i s t o r y / M e m o r y / A n a l o g y
 
The most fundamental part of Aldo’s work was his reliance on history. To understand his approach to history as it relates to his work can be summed up in his own words, “I cannot be postmodern since I was never modern.” In a way, this idea is most interesting in the way it both sets Aldo’s work apart and links it to the history of architecture. By rejecting modernism, Aldo chose to tie his work to everything that proceeded modernism. He also rejected post-modernism as disconnected and trite. While working on a project at the Institute for Architecture and Urban Studies in New York, where Aldo taught, I proposed a solution that abstracted some classicist elements. Aldo was furious. He exclaimed, “you don’t know anything about classical architecture, and you are from New Orleans.” At that point, he explained that I had two choices: one was to use the classical orders (any could work) as a quotation—accurate and precise, or use a modern form that was devoid of any historical reference or style. His approach to history was modern and absolute—black or white.
 
Memory and history are intimately intertwined. For Aldo, memory transcended history. Just as history was manifest in the physical form of buildings, memory connected the abstract metaphysical aspects of architecture to the essential symbols of mankind. It was these memories that infused architecture (and all art forms) with universal meaning. Memory could influence a building by virtue of its imprint on the site or context or in forms that recall traditional or universal symbols. When Aldo received the Pritzker Prize for Architecture, he spoke about Palladio and his influence in Architecture. His influence moved from Veneto to England, Russia, and ultimately America. The memory of the original sacred forms took on new meaning with each migration.
 
If history and memory were ways for Aldo to tie his work to specific moments, places, or persons, analogy enabled his forms to defy time and deny specific references. The use of analogous forms connected the built objects to universal symbols and images. Organization of these formal elements included the basic building blocks of buildings – domes, columns, arcades, pediments, as well as skeletons, horses, and teapots. His architecture was built with rigor in a rational way but these formal elements were infused by a metaphysical and sometime irrational presence. I remember one trip to the Modena Cemetery when the cube was being constructed. I accompanied Aldo and Gianni Braghieri to visit the site and decide the final material for the cube. Originally the cube was designed in brick and due to budget constraints the proposal was to change the material to stucco. After many discussions Aldo said, “okay.” He explained later that the red stucco was more metaphysical in it’s lack of detail and scale. He liked the power of the structure, the color, and most particularly the shadows.
 
 
F r a g m e n t s / T y p o l o g y / R e p e t i t i o n
 
Aldo’s fragments were his souvenirs of life. His personal experiences, bits of places or buildings, were recomposed in his own landscape of forms. Aldo liked to, and said he even preferred, to see a movie starting somewhere in the middle and watching the beginning after the end. He liked the displacement of the plot and time. For the same reason that I think he liked to incorporate pieces of his life into his projects. Bits of Hopper’s New York in Berlin, Italian piazzas in Florida, German towers in the Italian lake district. We see the elements in drawings and as built form. We see pieces of a city or particular project recurring in new projects or drawings until they become an integral part of his architectural lexicon.
 
If the fragment was a way to incorporate quotidian experiences into projects, typology was a way to incorporate the collective experiences of building morphology. The presence of type tied buildings to their regional heritage and the history of a specific building type. Aldo’s rational buildings mirrored generic building types. In this way, built form immediately has a heritage. (Think of a grid of Bernd and Hilla Becher’s photographs.) Aldo also chose to eliminate all non-essential elements in order to produce buildings that were prototypical of their typologies. He saw his buildings as pure type. For Aldo, form did not follow function. Form followed type.
 
If we look at Aldo’s work in buildings and drawings, we see forms and images constantly repeated. Repetition was fundamental to his architecture and his process. When I think of Aldo, I think of long buildings punctuated with rows of square windows, columns and square arched openings, roof stacked upon roof stacked upon roof. Repetition and more repetition. His drawings were filled with similar images—pediments, bathing cabins, coffee pots, saint’s hands, figures peeking out of openings, pyramids, and conical towers. These forms and the reworking of these forms enabled Aldo to edit and reedit his vision. In a similar way he would tell and retell stories to those close to him. His son, Fausto and I would always talk among ourselves about how many times we each heard the same stories. It didn’t matter how many times he told a story that was important. He could retell every story in a new and fresh way each time. In the end, the material was not as important as the process.
 
 
P l a t o n i c F o r m s / S h a d o w / C o l o r
 
The forms that Aldo used to create his architectural vocabulary could be described as platonic. Perhaps not literally, however the use of basic fundamental volumes like cubes, cones, and cylinders relates to Aldo’s preference for objects and elements that were straightforward and honest. He felt that a building should look like it was put together tectonically. He enjoyed telling the story about a professor that criticized his work as looking like that of a stonemason. Much to the professor’s dismay Aldo thought that it was a supreme compliment. Aldo bougtht a villa on Lago Maggiore. He liked the rough and direct construction. One thing that bothered him, and the first thing he removed, was a balcony that had a large cantilever. To him, the cantilever was not architectural. He disliked it not because it didn’t fit stylistically, but because it appeared to defy gravity.
 
Aldo loved to create heavy shadows. Shadows added depth, melancholy, and mystery to his work. He used shadows in his buildings like a material. The effect was to create a product that was both substantial and metaphysical. If we look at his sketches of buil dings we find a careful balance of light with heavy shadows. DeChirico paintings and Italian neo realist films influenced his use of shadow. In fact, Aldo maintained that if he had not been an architect he would have been a filmmaker. He was avid filmgoer who enjoyed all movies from obscure Russian films to funny French films and Hollywood blockbusters. I took him to see Blue Velvet, which became one of his favorite films. Appropriately, he was fascinated by the mysterious undertone in the seemingly ordinary landscape.
 
Aldo infused his work with metaphor and meaning using color as a vital tool. Color had meaning rooted in both architecture and theory. His baby blue roofs, yellow walls, red square brick arches, acid copper cornices, and green window frames all had roots and meanings in Aldo’s life. The childlike quality of these Rossian colors defies their complex provenance. Most of these colors relate directly to his experiences. The roots are diverse and layered in meaning: baby blue (celeste della Madonna) relates to his catholic upbringing; yellow walls red brick are found throughout his Lombardia in the vernacular architecture; he discovered acid copper cornices when he first visited America; and green window frames are as typical and universal as his perfect four square windows. His love of color was reflected in his love of Goethe’s Theory of Colors. Here he found profound meaning in Goethe’s ‘scientific’ approach and explanations. He loved the description of blue as a color of beauty and sickness.
 
If I try to remember some event or aspect of Aldo’s personality that reflects his approach to architecture I think of his love of sushi. When he came to New York for a week, he would have sushi for lunch and dinner almost every day. (He would have gone every day but most people could not keep up.) The compulsion, the ritual, the perfect typological presentation, the color, simplicity and complexity, the history and the cultural implications were the perfect compliment to a man that brought those same qualities to his work.
 
– Morris Adjmi, 2015
 
 
fondazionealdorossi.org
 
 
Image Credit: Alexander Severin
 
 
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